Longest Sleepers: 10 Most Sleepiest Animals On Earth

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Sleep is what makes humans and animals more efficient. Adult humans sleep an average of eight hours a day, which makes us seem extremely active. The following is the list of 10 animals that earned the reputation for being the longest sleepers on earth:

10. Elegant fat-tailed mouse opossum

The elegant fat-tailed mouse opossum, also known as the Chilean mouse opossum, is an opossum from central Chile. Opossums prefer environments near streams or swamps. They take shelter in burrows of other animals, tree cavities, brush piles, and other covers and usually sleeps for 14 hours per day.

9. American Badger

American badgers live in dry, open grasslands, fields, pastures, and meadows throughout the western United States, Mexico and northward through Canada’s central western provinces.

Built low-to-the-ground, these stocky, muscular animals measure 20″ to 35” in length and weigh 9 to 26 pounds. Badgers sleep and rest in their burrows year-round and take refuge in them in harsh winter weather, and on average sleep for 14.3 hours per day.

8. Koala

Though often called the koala “bear,” this cuddly animal is not a bear at all; it is a marsupial or pouched mammal. Koalas live in eastern Australia, where the eucalyptus trees they love are most plentiful. During the day they doze, tucked into forks or nooks in the trees, sleeping for up to 14.5 hours. When not asleep a koala feeds on eucalyptus leaves, especially at night.

7. Squirrel

Squirrels are nimble, bushy-tailed rodents found all over the world. There are more than 200 species of squirrels, from tree squirrels and flying squirrels to chipmunks and marmots. They sleep for 14.5 hours each day and on average, eat about one pound of food per week. They are also fantastic runners and can run 20 mph (32 kph).

6. Tree Shrew

The common treeshrew is a small mammal resembling squirrels and is native to Thailand, Malaysia, and Indonesia. They sleep for 15.5 hours each day and most are active in the daytime, searching for insects and fruit to consume. They drink frequently and are also fond of bathing.

5. Night Monkey

The night monkeys, also known as the owl monkeys are mysterious and rarely seen primates because they are active only at night, and rest in the tree holes during the day for 17 to 18 hours. They are native to Panama and much of tropical South America and usually inhabit dense tropical rainforests, located on the high altitudes.

4. Python

The python snake can grow as long as 33 feet or more and are found in South Asia and Southeast Asia. Python sleeps for 19 hours a day, and wake up only for an evening stroll. They are fairly lazy creatures, which makes sense since they only really eat about once a week. They conserve their energy most of the time by resting and sleeping, hence why they are normally only up for a couple of hours a day.

3. Little Brown Bat

The Little brown bat is one of the most common bats of North America. It is very small with an overall body size that is from 3 inches to 3 ½ inches and weighs no more than half.

Despite their size, bats live more than three times longer than other mammals — some as long as 30 years. Their relatively long lives may be related to their sleeping habits. They asleep for 19 hours during the day and wake up in the early evening. The first thing they’ll do when they wake up is fly around and around their caves for a while.

2. Little Pocket Mouse

The little pocket mouse is a species of rodent that is found in the desert regions of Mexico and the southwestern United States. Because they use energy and water so efficiently, Little Pocket Mice can inhabit some of the driest and least vegetated parts of North America.

They usually asleep up to 20.1 hours per day and typically remain underground for months every year, frequently in a state of torpor, their metabolism and body temperatures lowered, waking occasionally to feed on the seeds they have stored.

1. Big Hairy Armadillo

The big hairy armadillo is one of the largest and most numerous armadillos in South America. Armadillos are not social creatures and spend most of their time sleeping. They usually sleep up to (approx.) 20.4 hours per day in burrows and are active during the night, claiming the title of the longest sleepers on earth.